Robotics Roundup: Oct 17, 2022


The Robotics Roundup is a weekly newspost going over some of the most exciting developments in robotics over the past week.

In today’s edition we have:

BONUS: Humanoid robot addresses House of Lords committee in Parliament

  1. In South Korea, robots are on the job. So how is the service?
  2. Design engineering a walking robotic manipulator for in-space assembly missions
  3. Everyone walks differently — so this exoskeleton adjusts on the fly
  4. A Farm Of Robots: How Do We Define A Collection Of Modern, Smart Devices?
  5. After perfecting 3-pointers, this basketball robot is learning to dribble

BONUS: Humanoid robot addresses House of Lords committee in Parliament

The Telegraph presents Ai-Da’s recent testimony before the UK’s House of Lords.


In South Korea, robots are on the job. So how is the service?

This Experience magazine article speaks about the current state of robotic service workers, and their increasing proliferation throughout the hospitality industry. Featuring an interview from ROBOTIS’ own Will Son.


Design engineering a walking robotic manipulator for in-space assembly missions

This research paper goes into depth detailing the design of a walking robotic manipulator for use in extrasolar assembly. The novel design of the proposed manipulator would afford it major flexibility in deployments both on and off planet.


Everyone walks differently — so this exoskeleton adjusts on the fly

A major roadblock in the adoption of prosthetics and assistive technologies is the fact that no to bodies are the same, so each prosthesis or assistive device needs to be customized for each end user or risk poor usability and high levels of discomfort. This prototype exoskeleton solves this issue by utilizing machine learning in order to adjust to each user in around an hour, in real world conditions using only the onboard sensors included in the exoskeleton.


A Farm Of Robots: How Do We Define A Collection Of Modern, Smart Devices?

The way we think about things has a profound effect on how we interact with them, and in the emerging field of “Robots as a Service” the prevailing thought has been to think about robots the same way we think about managed servers. Florian Pestoni argues that in order to move the field forward, we need to think about our managed robots in a different way.


After perfecting 3-pointers, this basketball robot is learning to dribble

Toyota’s CUE basketball robot made a big splash last year at the Tokyo Olympics, and after setting a world record for consecutive shots is ready to move on to the next challenge.